Guest Blog: Dr Hannah Marston, Research Fellow, The Open University’s Faculty of Mathematics, Computer and Technology – The Future of Technology in the Lives of an Ageing Society


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


Technology has become an integral part of people’s lives since the turn of the 21st Century.

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Guest Blog: Eric Khilstrom, CEO of KareInn, and Tina Woods, Head of Lansons Health – The Future of Retirement Savings : a new way of thinking about ageing is needed to come up with innovative solutions for the future


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


There is a real danger of the generation retiring between 2025 and 2040 being underprepared for retirement, caused by inadequate savings and pensions pots being overly dominated by macroeconomic tinkering.  This is increasing the risk of a “sandwich generation” required to care for the generation above and below them simultaneously.

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Guest Blog: Ann Blaylock, University of Innsbruck Research Institute of Textile Chemistry and Textile Physics – The Future of Ageing: Textiles for an Ageing Society (TAGS)


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


In the modern day, with the ever-increasing predominance of technology, it is easy to forget about the other elements that are fundamental to our daily lives and routine.

“Textiles…do you mean clothing?”

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Opportunity Knocks

Innovation and technological advance offer enormous opportunities in an ageing society. It is crucial that we seize them – OBR forecasts show that without significant improvements to productivity growth healthcare spending as a percentage of GDP could more than double by 2064. Continue reading

Guest blog: Lyndsey Burton, Choose.Net – How will the digital nature of Universal Credit affect older people?

Universal Credit (UC) is the government’s first “digital by default” benefit, with claimants expected to use the internet to apply, and then check on their payments. It combines six existing benefits: housing benefit, income support, employment support allowance, jobseekers allowance, working tax credit and child tax credit.
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Guest blog: Douglas White – Digital Participation in 7 Steps

The internet is now described by many people as ‘the fourth utility’ while having access to the web is increasingly seen as a basic facet of 21st century life. But nearly two-thirds of people aged 65 and over are not online.  This is a major problem. Why? Well, digital technology often has the potential to help address, or at least mitigate, a number of the social and economic disadvantages faced by some older people. But as the technology gets better and faster every year, the divide between those who are connected and those who are not grows wider. This means that existing inequalities are rapidly becoming even more entrenched. Continue reading

Payments divide

Last week’s infrastructure collapse by NatWest/RBS brought into focus our increasing reliance on technology to support payments.

Many thousands found themselves embarrassed in petrol stations and supermarkets, finding their credit and debit card’s refused. Online banking systems failed and consumers hit to social media to vent anger.

The way we pay for goods and services is hardly the sexiest topic we at ILC-UK are lucky enough to explore. But as we saw last week, it is all too easy to become complacent about what is a fundamentally important part of our economy. Continue reading

Guest blog: Chris Marling – Can smartphones made for older people get them using mobile services?

It is a widely held assumption that internet services can be a strong force for good for the older population. But it is equally clear that for many there is not enough motivation for them to engage with these new technologies. So is there a way smartphones can help bridge that gap?

A recent Ofcom report claimed a third of 55 to 64 year-olds are now using social networking (25 per cent for the over 65s), let alone email and the internet. But there’s a big drop off in the over-75s, with just 28 per cent having the internet at home at all. Continue reading