Guest Blog: Liam Foster – The Future of Pensions: Will recent pension changes alter levels of pensioner poverty?


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


Drawing on an article written for In Defence of Welfare 2, this blog considers the extent to which pension changes made under the Coalition government represent a more positive future for pensions.

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Guest Blog: Steve Groves, Partnership – The Future of Financing Later Life


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


I am going to start with a prediction:

“Retirement as we know it, will die off with the Defined Benefit pensions that financed it”

That’s the easy one out the way; I’ll spend the rest of the time working out why; what might replace it; and what we can learn from this, both now from a policy viewpoint and later from a societal viewpoint. Continue reading

Guest Blog: Brian Please – Nothing takes away from the need for guaranteed levels of income in retirement!

Equiniti has just published its sixth Annual Retirement Survey with input from colleagues and professionals throughout the pensions and annuity industry. This has evidenced change and trends to the issues across advice, guidance, products, pricing, scams and legislation relating not only to annuities but all things to do with retirement. Continue reading

Special Blog: The Macroeconomic Implications of Population Ageing

Key points

  • Population ageing is a worldwide phenomenon and should be celebrated.
  • It will dramatically reshape the developing world in particular.
  • Has big implications for economic growth and debt sustainability.
  • Dependency ratio remains relevant from a public spending perspective.
  • UK has relatively favourable demographics relative to other developed countries but remains exposed to these headwinds.
  • Boosting fertility, migration and working longer could all have positive effects on economic output over the long run.
  • But raising productivity growth of the labour market and specific public services such as health care will also be key.

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