Guest blog: Dr Bonnie-Jeanne MacDonald, Dalhousie University – Replacing the replacement rate: How much is ‘enough’ retirement income?

The final earnings replacement rate – where 70% is often advocated as the ‘right’ target – has been a longstanding and widespread measure of retirement income adequacy. Financial planners use this benchmark, as do actuaries and other pension plan advisers, academics, and public policy analysts. Continue reading

Guest Blog: Ann Blaylock, University of Innsbruck Research Institute of Textile Chemistry and Textile Physics – The Future of Ageing: Textiles for an Ageing Society (TAGS)


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


In the modern day, with the ever-increasing predominance of technology, it is easy to forget about the other elements that are fundamental to our daily lives and routine.

“Textiles…do you mean clothing?”

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Guest Blog: Jilly Forster, Forster Communications – The Future of Business: When business gets smart on age…


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


When we are failing the old and the young, our society has come to a pretty pass. Where we are failing, however, is in an understanding of and empathy with what it means to be both 17 and 71. Continue reading

Special Blog: The Macroeconomic Implications of Population Ageing

Key points

  • Population ageing is a worldwide phenomenon and should be celebrated.
  • It will dramatically reshape the developing world in particular.
  • Has big implications for economic growth and debt sustainability.
  • Dependency ratio remains relevant from a public spending perspective.
  • UK has relatively favourable demographics relative to other developed countries but remains exposed to these headwinds.
  • Boosting fertility, migration and working longer could all have positive effects on economic output over the long run.
  • But raising productivity growth of the labour market and specific public services such as health care will also be key.

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