Guest Blog: Rochelle Amour, Ageing Consultant and Writer – The Future of Healthcare: The challenges and opportunities facing Trinidad and Tobago’s aging population


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


A few weeks ago, a video of an 89-year old man being physically and verbally abused at a private Old Age Home in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) elicited national outrage on social media. The incident raised serious concerns about the challenges Trinbagonians face regarding the health and care of older persons. Continue reading

Guest Blog: Dr Jon Minton, College of Social Sciences, University of Glasgow – The Future of Life Expectancy: Shifting mortality hurdles and why ageing isn’t what it used to be


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


“No one wins. One side just loses more slowly.”

This statement, made by Prez, a character on the critically acclaimed TV show The Wire, isn’t a bad way to start thinking about longevity. Of course no one can live for ever; all we can do is lose more slowly, travelling further along the life course to reach ever older ages. The life course is a series of hurdles, age specific mortality risks, each of varying heights, each of which have to be cleared before we can continue to live another year. We hope to clear more of these hurdles, travelling further into older ages, and hope to do so without sustaining too many sprains and injuries (acquiring multiple morbidities) along the way. Continue reading

Guest Blog: Yvonne Sonsino, Mercer – The Future of Ageing – There are new rules of living longer…


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


There are new rules of living longer…

Eleven of them to be precise, based on current life expectancy. But we may need to add a few more with hindsight and health technology. First new rule – you will be working longer to pay for that longer life. Just adding three years to your life expectancy (the difference between my daughter and her daughter’s average ‘vital’ statistics) could cost upwards of £130,000 in today’s money. In the UK, nine years of extra life have already been added since those retiring in the 1980s. Imagine if you add another 25 years. Or another 40. How much longer will you have to work? Will you ever be able to retire?

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