The bringing together of health and social care

The increasing pressure on the NHS is hard to ignore, and it’s growing. For too long the perception that social care and health care are two separate entities has caused challenges and prevented any real resolution to the strain on the NHS. The move to integrate them has seemingly stalled, to be replaced with funding promises that will do little to create a long-term solution.

Continue reading

Nursing an open wound – Healthcare demand and nursing supply

This extended blog explores recent trends in the demand for healthcare and the supply of nurses, before reflecting on how government policy changes are impacting on the ability of the nursing sector to meet rising needs. We argue that with nursing shortages gripping the NHS, it is time to evaluate how recent policy has failed to get to grips with the problem, and develop a new strategic framework to improve the participation of nurses in the health service.  Continue reading

Guest blog: Dr Marianne Coleman, Emeritus Reader in Educational Leadership, Institute of Education – The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society

Longer life expectancy and the resulting ageing of the population is popularly seen as problematic, with a focus on the costs and problems involved. But having a longer life is good news for most people and such a major demographic shift creates opportunities to re-think attitudes and values to the benefit of us all. Continue reading

Guest Blog: Clare Bambra, Professor of Public Health Geography, Department of Geography, Durham University – Where you live can kill you

In 1842, the English social reformer Edwin Chadwick documented a 30-year discrepancy between the life expectancy of men in the poorest social classes and the gentry. He also found a North-South health divide with people from all social classes faring better in the rural South than in the industrial North. Continue reading

Future of Ageing Guest blog: Lucy Bryning and Carys Jones, Research Officers, Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation, Bangor University – Developing and evaluating sustainable services in an ageing society

People are living longer and we have an aging population, and with this comes increasing costs in the face of limited resources. In recent years there has been a shift in perspective of what age is considered to be ‘old’.  Continue reading