Out of the limelight: older people left in the shadows of the data revolution

Since the censuses of ancient times, policy makers have relied on data. In what the UN is terming a data revolution, technological advancement now means that we have more information than ever at our fingertips. Bigger datasets covering more people and more topics have the potential to highlight the experiences of previously marginalised groups. Indeed, the UN Secretary General’s High Level Panel of Eminent Persons has proposed that data be disaggregated ‘by gender, geography, income, disability and other categories to ensure that no-one is left behind’. Continue reading

Guest blog: Stuart Fox – Young people won’t vote tomorrow, and older people will – but we won’t notice the difference…

Tomorrow the country will head to the polls to vote in the European elections. As far as most voters and the media is concerned, the outcome of the election will have much more significance for domestic politics than European. The campaign has been dominated – as will the days and weeks following the election – by speculation about what the results mean not for the European Parliament, but for the electoral fortunes of the major parties in the 2015 General Election.
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Guest blog: Professor Philip Cowley – Age and the politics of presence

All the mainstream British political parties are – to varying degrees – now signed up to the underlying principle that political institutions should broadly reflect the social characteristics of the people they represent.  David Cameron’s very first speech as party leader in 2005 contained the claim that ‘We will change the way we look’. Ed Miliband has made several speeches on the same theme.  The idea that what Anne Phillips called ‘the politics of presence’ is important is now a widely, if not wholly, accepted part of political discourse in the UK.
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