Guest Blog: Luca Brunelli, Ryan Woolrych and Harry Smith – The Future of Ageing-in-Place: a new well-being agenda for local high streets


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


Meeting the challenges of an ageing population has generated debate on the types of supportive environments needed to enable older adults to retain a sense of independence and well-being.

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Guest Blog: Sophie Handler, Chair of the RIBA Working Group on Research and Ageing – The Future of Design: What makes a designer Age-friendly?


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


There are now over 256 designated Age-friendly cities across the world. From Liverpool to Manchester, New York City to Delhi each of these 256 cities is signed up, in theory, to the principles of the WHO global network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities, committed to practical action across its eight working domains.

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Guest Blog: Theodora Bowering, University of Cambridge Department of Architecture – The Future of Civic Spaces: Ageing and the City: Urban resilience and sociospatial marginalisation of the elderly in East London’


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


I stand holding my cup of peppermint tea, looking for a place to sit. I see that all the tables are full and I am pleased. I have spied an elderly lady sitting alone and really hope that I can talk to her.

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Climate Change: an age old problem?

Less than 50% of those over 55 say they are ‘very likely to take action’ to try to mitigate climate change.

Climate change and our ageing population are usually presented as separate issues, but closer attention to their interaction could yield positive change. Not only are older people are major contributors to environmental damage, they also represent an increasing proportion of our population. Continue reading