Guest blog: Nick Sanderson, Chief Executive, Audley Retirement Villages – Downsizing and the housing black hole

It came as no surprise to me when I saw the findings of the recent ‘State of the Nation’s Housing: An ILC-UK Factpack’ report from the International Longevity Centre (ILC) earlier this month. It’s the latest report to highlight a major issue: baby boomers are stuck in housing that is unsuitable for their needs, a situation that is putting the whole property market at risk of grinding to a standstill. Continue reading

Guest Blog: Katia Attuyer, Mark Bevan and Karen Croucher, Centre for Housing Policy – The Future of Housing: Taking forward age friendly environments in a changing policy landscape


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


There is a growing recognition of the value of a built environment that is as inclusive of as wide a range of needs across all ages as possible.

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Guest Blog: Howard Nankivell, Anchor – The Future of Retirement Housing: Retirement is changing beyond all recognition


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


Retirement is changing beyond all recognition. Many people are living healthier lives for longer. But more will need to manage multiple long-term conditions including, unless a cure is found, dementia. Continue reading

Guest Blog: Andrew Harding, Bournemouth University – The Future of Welfare Consumerism: Future challenges and opportunities of welfare consumerism in health and social care


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


The rationale for the creation of the welfare state in the post war period was, in large part, because a market approach to welfare had failed. So how can the market and consumerism now be the solution? Despite this philosophical question, for more than two decades welfare consumerism and markets has been and continues to be at the heart of UK health and social care policy. This presents many challenges and opportunities for practitioners, policymakers and researchers alike – particularly concerning older people. Continue reading

Guest blog: Nick Sanderson, Audley Retirement – Older people deserve accommodation that meets their needs and desires

The ILC-UK’s report might come as a surprise to those that don’t know much about the retirement village concept. For those of us that run retirement villages with flexible care provision, it serves primarily to add statistical evidence to what we have long believed to be the case: living in this kind of accommodation has a positive impact on quality of life.

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