Person-centred care – what does it really stand for, and why do we need it today? 

Ageing populations across the world have resulted in health and social care services coming under increasing pressure as they attempt to treat and look after greater numbers of older people. In addition, social commentators have noted changing expectations amongst older people, an increasing number of whom expect to be more directly engaged in decisions about their health, and to be supported to self-manage their health, and in particular chronic conditions.
Continue reading

Guest Blog: Rochelle Amour, Ageing Consultant and Writer – The Future of Healthcare: The challenges and opportunities facing Trinidad and Tobago’s aging population


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


A few weeks ago, a video of an 89-year old man being physically and verbally abused at a private Old Age Home in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) elicited national outrage on social media. The incident raised serious concerns about the challenges Trinbagonians face regarding the health and care of older persons. Continue reading

Guest Blog: Eric Khilstrom, CEO of KareInn, and Tina Woods, Head of Lansons Health – The Future of Retirement Savings : a new way of thinking about ageing is needed to come up with innovative solutions for the future


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


There is a real danger of the generation retiring between 2025 and 2040 being underprepared for retirement, caused by inadequate savings and pensions pots being overly dominated by macroeconomic tinkering.  This is increasing the risk of a “sandwich generation” required to care for the generation above and below them simultaneously.

Continue reading

Guest Blog: Tina Woods, Head of Lansons Health and Eric Khilstrom, CEO of KareInn – The Future of elderly care: a new way of thinking about ageing is needed to come up with innovative solutions for the future


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


“The first person to reach the age of 135 has already been born, but it is wrong to think that we can take the life stories of our parents and grandparents as a blueprint for the way our own lives should unfold” according to Rudi Westendorp, an expert on geriatric medicine who has just written a book “Growing Older without Feeling Old”.

Continue reading

Guest Blog: Robin Hadley, SRIP Doctoral Prize Winner 2015 – The Future of Care: The case of the invisible older childless men…


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


In a recent speech to the Local Government Association Jeremy Hunt, Sectary of State for Health, said:

“Family planning must be as much about care for older generations as planning for younger ones. A wholesale repairing of the social contract so that children see their parents giving wonderful care to grandparents – and recognise that in time that will be their responsibility too”

With government policy directed towards the care of older people falling on to families the question is what happens to those who do not have families? What is their future?

Continue reading

Guest Blog: Andrew Harding, Bournemouth University – The Future of Welfare Consumerism: Future challenges and opportunities of welfare consumerism in health and social care


This blog is one in a series of blogs on the Future of Ageing, published in the lead up to the ILC-UK Future of Ageing conference on the 24th November. To register to attend this conference, click here.


The rationale for the creation of the welfare state in the post war period was, in large part, because a market approach to welfare had failed. So how can the market and consumerism now be the solution? Despite this philosophical question, for more than two decades welfare consumerism and markets has been and continues to be at the heart of UK health and social care policy. This presents many challenges and opportunities for practitioners, policymakers and researchers alike – particularly concerning older people. Continue reading