Guest blog: Stephen Burke, United for All Ages – Is attacking pensioners the best way to promote intergenerational fairness?

After a lengthy inquiry, MPs on the Work and Pensions Select Committee have published their recommendations to tackle intergenerational fairness.

In short they suggest scrapping the triple lock on pensions and reviewing the winter fuel allowance. But are these measures the best way to promote fairness between the generations? Continue reading

Guest blog: Dr Bonnie-Jeanne MacDonald, Dalhousie University – Replacing the replacement rate: How much is ‘enough’ retirement income?

The final earnings replacement rate – where 70% is often advocated as the ‘right’ target – has been a longstanding and widespread measure of retirement income adequacy. Financial planners use this benchmark, as do actuaries and other pension plan advisers, academics, and public policy analysts. Continue reading

Guest Blog: Dr Valerie Egdell, Employment Research Institute, and Professor Jill Stavert & Rebecca McGregor, Centre for Mental Health and Incapacity Law Rights and Policy, Edinburgh Napier University – Understanding the Legal Implications of Dementia in the Workplace

As outlined by Professor Jane Elliott during the 2015 Future of Ageing conference the most important predictive factor for the development of dementia is age. However, of the over 800,000 people with dementia in the UK, in excess of 40,000 are aged under 65 years1. Continue reading

Guest blog: Dr Marianne Coleman, Emeritus Reader in Educational Leadership, Institute of Education – The future challenges and opportunities of health and care in an ageing society

Longer life expectancy and the resulting ageing of the population is popularly seen as problematic, with a focus on the costs and problems involved. But having a longer life is good news for most people and such a major demographic shift creates opportunities to re-think attitudes and values to the benefit of us all. Continue reading

Guest Blog: Clare Bambra, Professor of Public Health Geography, Department of Geography, Durham University – Where you live can kill you

In 1842, the English social reformer Edwin Chadwick documented a 30-year discrepancy between the life expectancy of men in the poorest social classes and the gentry. He also found a North-South health divide with people from all social classes faring better in the rural South than in the industrial North. Continue reading